Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/12380
Title: Factors affecting immunization coverage of children under five years in Elashabiyaha district, Lower Shabelle region, Somalia
Authors: Hassan, Liban Jama
Keywords: Public health
Immunization coverage
Elashabiyaha district
Children under five years
Somalia
Issue Date: Dec-2013
Publisher: Kampala international international: School of Health Sciences
Abstract: Background: Elashabiyaha is one of the largest districts in Lower Shabelle region Somalia who has accommodated one of the most populous Somali IDPs camps. Only 30% of children are immunized against the six major childhood diseases. These are far below the targeted average percentage of 80%. This study was conducted to explore current immunization coverage of the children under five years in Elashabiyaha and to assess factors affecting immunization coverage of the children under five years in Elashabiyaha district. Objectives: The study aimed to assess factors affecting immunization coverage of children under five years in Elashabiyaha district lower Shabelle region Somalia. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to detem1ine the factors affecting immunization coverage in Elashabiyaha district. Researcher administered questionnaire was used to interview 330 of household heads in Elashabiyaha district. Univariate analysis was done to find out the percentage of the cunent immunization coverage. Bivariate analysis was done to assess the factors affecting immunization coverage .Logistic regression was then used to adjust for the effect of the confounding factors and to make multivaraiate analysis on different significant factors. Results: Immunization coverage is 43.8% and there was 2 times more likely for household heads who believe in traditional healers as an altemative not to immunize their children [95% CI 1.315-3.370: p=0.002] than those who reported not believing in traditional healers. And also it was 2 times more likely for household heads who were lacking outreach immunization services not to immunize their children [95% CI 1.082-2.764: p=0.022] than those reported accessing outreach immunization services. Conclusion~ Low immunization coverage at only 43.8% was found. Lack of outreach immunization services, cultural beliefs such as believing that traditional healers are better than immunization services and believing that westems spread diseased through immunization were assessed as factors that were associated with low immunization coverage in the study area. Recommendations: Better understanding of local perceptions and behavior related to immunization, building health education programs upon traditional beliefs and practices and expansion of outreach sites were recommended. The government, local, international NGOs and health professionals need to introduce immunization services to the community, make immunization services affordable, available, accessible and all the wrong beliefs and misconceptions need to be eradicated.
Description: A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the Requirements for the award of degree of Master of public health from Kampala International University
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12306/12380
Appears in Collections:Masters of Public Health

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